By NyishaHv
149 days ago

What is Law? An introduction

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Write the article hereindeed means different things for different people. People may see the law differently according to their culture, nationality or even religion can bare an influence on peoples beliefs about the law and may even contradict such beliefs. What is law? Law is by definition a system of rules and regulations, potential sanctions to prohibit those from breaking the 'law of the land'. Law has the implication that there are certain codes of conduct a society must adhere to. Usually there is a hierarchical structure to different jurisdictions. An example of this is the UK constitution which is made up of what we call an codified constitution. This means that our constitution (by contrast to the american constitution) is not written down in one single document. Ultimately, our constitution is made up of precedent, statute and so on. The unwritten nature of our constitution makes it so it can be flexible and subject to change.

The notion of bicameralism suggests that there is an upper chamber (the house of lords) and a lower chamber which is the house of commons. Both chambers have different crucial functions. The house of Lords can scrutinise bills, it also reviews and amends bills of the house of commons. The house of commons which is the 'lower house' there are a number of stages that take place when a law is being created. First there is the drafting of the bill; then there is a number of reading that takes place. A bill is also known as 'draft legislation. The final stage of a law being passed, is the Royal assent, whereby the Queen only acts symbolically and therefore signs the law and does not intervene in the law-making process itself.

Different countries will have different jurisdictions, different policies. Countries may also have different concepts of the meaning of 'law', moral subjectivity holds that the meaning of law varies from place to place and culture, to culture. And so this is evidence in the strong contrast in the constitution of the UK and America. Our political structures are also different as there are federalist countries such as America which is completely different to the UK's unitary political nature.

By NyishaHv
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soncee Beautiful artikle
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RasmaSandra Interesting facts. Laws are as diverse as the countries they represent.
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NyishaHv Thankyou, @RasmaSandra I agree!
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indexer Can I correct you on a couple of facts? You seem to imply that the House of Lords is mainly responsible for making laws. This is the function mainly of the House of Commons - the Lords can only revise laws and make suggestions for the Commons to consider.

Also, it was certainly true in the past that the Lords were mainly hereditary, but that is no longer the case. Most active members are "Life Peers" who have been given the honour because of their particular expertise or because they are former members of the House of Commons who want to continue to exercise a political role. The number of hereditary peers who can speak and vote in the Lords is now strictly limited and subject to an electoral process (albeit not a public vote).
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faithfilia This is beautiful
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Mfoss Fantastic article dear, very insightful.
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Angeloflife Very good article dear. Very interesting 😋
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