By indexer
179 days ago

Grange-over-Sands, Cumbria

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The sands in question are those on the edge of Morecambe Bay in north-west England, which is renowned for the huge distance to which the sea recedes at low tide and the speed with which it returns when the tide turns.

Grange-over-Sands began as a quiet fishing village that was “discovered” by the Victorians who liked the year-round mild climate of this sheltered resort, backed by woodland. A sanatorium was established for the treatment of tuberculosis sufferers.

A mile-long promenade curves round the shore, fringed by gardens that feature rare trees and shrubs.

Two miles north is Lindale-in-Cartmel, where a 12 metre high iron pillar forms a monument to John Wilkinson (1728-1808), an ironmaster who lived locally in his youth but went on to build the world’s first iron bridge at what was henceforth known an Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire.

To the east of Grange-over-Sands is Cartmel Priory, which was founded in 1188 and managed to escape the ravages of King Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries by virtue of establishing its claim to be the local parish church. The name “Grange” means farmstead, the original village having this function on behalf of the Priory.
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mcmanusmom What a beautiful place. Thanks for sharing the story behind it.
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carmen3521 Nice article
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RasmaSandra Sounds like a fascinating place. Looks almost like a desert.
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indexer @RasmaSandra This is Cumbria, so it gets plenty of rain! The tidal range is enormous, so at low tide there are literally miles of sand.
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RasmaSandra @indexer it is similar to the beach resort here called Jurmala. At low tide the water seems far away and there is so much sand you could walk along the shore for many, many miles.
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