By TammyWhite
2 years ago

Blue eyed grass

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Sisyrinchium rosulatum (also known as Annual Blue-eyed Grass) 
This flowers are a member of the iris family (family Iridaceae) which consists of herbs growing from rhizomes, bulbs, or corms, with narrow basal leaves and showy clusters at the tips of long stalks.

It can be a shy, retiring plant at times. They are small perennials, only 10-30 cm (4-12") tall, with leaves to 3 mm (1/8") wide. They start opening their eyes in early June and continue to look around all through June. But you have to be a morning person. Sometimes I have gone to photograph those pretty blue eyes in the afternoon only to find that they have already closed their eyes for the day. And just try to find them when their eyes are closed! Their medium green grass-like leaves fade into the background and mingle shyly with all the prairie grasses around them.

Each pretty blue eye sheds a tear when it is finished blooming, in the form of a small round seed capsule filled with tiny black seeds. Perhaps they are tears of happiness or perhaps they are tears of sorrow. We can only speculate. This plant is also known as Star Grass by some people because the flowers are distinctly star shaped. Blue-Eyed Grass is actually not a true grass, but a member of the Iris family, closely related to Blue Flag or Wild Iris (Iris versicolor).
Blue-Eyed Grass is a native perennial that grows across the prairies and parklands in open meadows.

In the garden Blue-Eyed Grass can be planted in sunny flower beds, rock gardens or mixed with other prairie wildflowers and grasses for a prairie meadow. It does well in combination with other small plants such as Pussy Toes, Three Flowered Avens, Lilac Beardtongue, Shrubby Evening Primrose, Upland White Aster, June Grass and Side Oats or Blue Grama Grass. This combination gives a succession of bloom from spring until fall.

The plants can be established either by direct seeding into the garden in October or by setting out plants. Fall seeding naturally stratifies the seed and allows it to begin germination in spring when the weather is still very cool. If the spring weather is very dry, it will be necessary to water the area twice a week to ensure good germination. Plants can be set out in the garden in the spring, as soon as the danger of frost is passed, or in summer.
2 years
Deliana I love this flowers!
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GinaEastabrooks Awesome article dear
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Violeta Nice photo
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soncee Beautiful
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dorageorg So nice!
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carmen3521 V nice
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MegyBella Awesome
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