By indexer
335 days ago

Thorny devil

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I’m not sure that I would really want to have this little fellow on my hand, but apparently they are quite harmless – to humans anyway!

The thorny devil (Moloch horridus) is native to the deserts of the western half of Australia. It is a lizard that measures 6 to 7 inches (15 to 18 centimetres) in length, and its buff and tan colouring, with darker brown markings, is a good reason why it is rarely seen against the similarly coloured desert floor.

However, if you were to tread on one when not wearing adequate footwear you would soon know about it, thanks to the spines that cover its entire body. The largest spines are on the head and body, with smaller ones on the legs and feet. These spines are entirely defensive, because the thorny devil spends most of its feeding time in one spot, scooping up ants and similar small insects with its long tongue – up to 2,500 at a single meal. This would leave it vulnerable to attack from above if it did not have the protection of its spines.

The thorny devil moves slowly, rocking backwards and forwards as it walks.

Female thorny devils lay between three and ten eggs in underground burrows.
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Justin Very interesting
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Violeta Very interesting article
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bee Looks like a baby dinosaur roooar!
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birjudanak it looks so dangerous but as you said not much harmless is good. god create everything for some reason and maybe it for protection. thanks for share something new really like it.
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indexer @birjudanak I would prefer to say that it has evolved that particular form of protection, just as every surviving species on the planet has done, one way or another.
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RasmaSandra Fascinating this thorny devil guy. I love the photo.
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milenazoran Interesting article!
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