By indexer
175 days ago

Bangor, North Wales

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The city of Bangor in North Wales has a very long history. It was also a special place in my youth as the home of my “alma mater” university!

Despite the existence of an earthwork known as “Roman Camp” there is no evidence of Roman occupation here, although they almost certainly passed this way on their way to invade Anglesey in 60 AD. Roman Camp is probably of Norman origin.

A Celtic monastery was founded here in the 6th century, as well as a bishopric that was one of the earliest in Britain. Bishop Deiniol was consecrated in 546 and was later declared a saint. It was after him that the cathedral, founded in the 12th century, was named.

The current cathedral does not contain much material from earlier centuries, being largely the result of extensive 19th century renovations conducted by Sir George Gilbert Scott. Plans to include a high tower and spire were abandoned when there was concern over whether the foundations were strong enough. The result is a somewhat squat building that is not all that distinguished, especially giving the cathedral’s site in a valley between prominent ridges.

Far more prominent is the main Arts Building of Bangor University, sited on the north-western ridge. This is sometimes mistaken by visitors for the Cathedral, although it more resembles an ocean liner than a place of worship. The University was opened in 1885 (as part of the University of Wales) and is therefore contemporaneous with the restored Cathedral.

I was a student there in the early 1970s and have “fond” memories of having to climb the hill to the college early in the morning then walk up lots of stairs to the top floor of the College for Philosophy seminars in the Professor’s office! I was a lot fitter then!

Education is now Bangor’s major “industry”, with many buildings across the city being part of the University.

Visitors to the city may be interested to take a walk in the “Bishop’s Garden”, alongside the Cathedral, which aims to include a specimen of every plant mentioned in the Bible that can stand the rigours of the North Wales climate.

Penrhyn Castle, on the eastern approach to Bangor, is owned by the National Trust for Wales and open to the public. It may appear to be of Norman origin but that is an illusion because most of it was built in the 19th century. It houses interesting displays including artworks and a railway museum.

West of the city is the Menai Suspension Bridge to Anglesey, built by Thomas Telford in 1826. Many pleasant walks can be taken across the bridge and alongside the Menai Straits.
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soncee Beautiful city amazing view
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dorageorg Nice view
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RasmaSandra Sounds like a city I would enjoy seeing. Of course, when I first read Bango I thought of Bangor, Maine and didn't know there was a city by the same name in North Wales. Interesting.
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indexer @RasmaSandra There is also a Bangor in Northern Ireland and another one in northeast Wales. As with many American cities, the name would have derived from the British original - presumably because the original settles were from those places. Hence Boston and Birmingham, but not New York - named after the Duke of York who became King James II.
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RasmaSandra @indexer Of course, because the British and the Americans were always mixing it up in one way or another, so to say. That is no wonder the same city names are on both sides of the ocean. What is really strange is that somehow Latvians got a hand in the pot too. I am presently in the process of moving away from Riga, Latvia but years ago when I went to visit in the US I discovered a city called Riga in a state but the name escapes me right now.
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Shavkat Nice place to explore
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