By TammyWhite
2 years ago

Castro de Baroña

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The Castro de Baroña is a Celtic settlement of the Iron Age that is in the parish of Baroña belonging to the municipality of Porto do Son in A Coruña (Galicia, Spain). Experts estimate that it was abandoned in the first century AD. It is a perfect example of maritime fort.


The Castro de Baroña in Porto do Son (Galicia)
The town was built on a rocky peninsula. The force of the sea eroded the fortifications. Nowadays, remains of houses with plants of circular or oval form are conserved. Also, apparently, there were workshops and warehouses. One of the things that surprises you the most is that everything is so well preserved (just as it surprises you that a site like this has no protection whatsoever, nor anyone who watches over it).

The complex is protected by several walls. Before the first wall there is a defensive pit. It is believed that the entire fort was walled (which makes all the sense in the world). Seeing the place, it can be deduced that the Castro de Baroña was undoubtedly built with the confidence of being an impregnable place that gave protection and security to its inhabitants.


The Castro de Baroña was discovered in 1933 (by the archaeologist Sebastián González García) and is declared a National Artistic Heritage and Property of Cultural Interest (something that does not surprise you when you discover this little forgotten jewel of coastal Galicia). After its discovery there were successive archaeological campaigns.

Archaeologists think that Castro was based on a maritime economy, that is, fish and seafood (you do not have to be an accomplished expert to deduce it). Most likely, they will also feed on cows, goats, sheep and wild fruits.

Finding the fort is not complicated but neither is it extremely simple. This is the location in Google Maps: http://bit.ly/1jd56Hn. It is located on the AC-550 that links Noia with Porto do Son. There is a sign indicating Castro de Baroña. Taken that detour is parked on a small side road (no asphalted parking). Then you take a path that starts at the side of the cafeteria-restaurant "O Castro". If you have doubts, better make some questions.


To the Castro is walking along a beautiful path of sand (the same that leads to the Playa de Arealonga, a beach where nudism is practiced, by the way). The road is marked with small parallel blue and red lines (as seen in the photo below). Admission is free. There is nobody watching or controlling the area. I went about 7 in the afternoon and, the truth is that it is a perfect time to take pictures and watch the sun fall on the hill. It is convenient that you do not get dark in the fort because the road is not illuminated and, when you return, you can, at least, twist an ankle (no matter how much you light up the path with your mobile).

The surroundings of Castro and the path that leads to it is of great beauty. In fact, the path that takes you to Punta do Castro is a pleasure in itself. I enjoyed stepping on branches, herbs and stones from the characteristic Galician forest that leads to Baroña.
Continuing with the above, beyond the importance of the Castro as an archaeological site, the Castro de Baroña, is unique for its privileged location, for its extraordinary location.

The charm of the site is multiplied by ten at sunrise and sunset, when the sunlight invites, with emphasis and elegance, to enjoy its beauty.

More images

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2 years
Laboresmely Sinxelo, maxico e realmente fermoso, un recuncho de natureza, historia e arte nun unico lugar
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Deliana The coast of Spain hides many treasures...great article, Tammy! 💕
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dorageorg Very interesting!
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Justin Hermoso lugar
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soncee Beautiful place
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Melsdename Gorgeous
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Lucia5 Super
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