By Borderline
2 years ago

Alexandra Palace

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Alexandra Palace opened on Queen Victoria's 54th birthday on Saturday 24th May 1873 with a grand celebration including concerts, recitals and fireworks. Tragedy struck 16 days later when a fire broke out in the Palace around Mid day on Monday 9th June 1873, most probably caused by workmen making a fire on the top of the central dome to warm themselves.

On 1st May 1875, less than 2 years after the destruction of the original building, a new Palace opened. Covering 7 acres, it was centred on the Great Hall, home to the mighty Willis Organ which was driven by two steam engines and vast bellows.


After certain financial difficulties, an Act of Parliament in 1900 created the Alexandra Palace and Park Trust. The Act required the Trustees to maintain the Palace and Park and make them “available for the free use and recreation of the public forever”.

During the War in 1914, the Theatre is converted into a chapel where the Catholic Belgians could take mass. In July, the AP Executive Committee agree to a request for soldiers and their horses to be billeted at the Palace in the event of mobilisation.

Following the outbreak of war the Palace grounds were closed without warning. Signs at each entrance read: ‘Until further notice, the Palace Grounds are closed to the public who are warned that any unauthorised person found in the grounds is liable to be shot—By Order’.

In May of 1915 , the war prisoners interred during WW1 were actually civilians of the UK who were collected and imprisoned here due to their German, Austrian or Hungarian heritage. The Palace was transformed with barbed wire, watch towers and armed guards.

In 1935, the BBC leased the eastern part of the building from which the first public television transmissions were made in 1936. Alexandra Palace was the main transmitting centre for the BBC until 1956, when it was used exclusively for news broadcasts.

During WW2, television broadcasts stopped but BBC transmitters at Alexandra Palace were used in a secret operation to jam radio signals used by German bomber pilots to identify their positions and targets.

A flying bomb explodes to the north of the building, damaging the roof of the Great Hall. As a result, the organ suffers water penetration and is covered in snow.


Just six months after the transfer of trusteeship to Haringey Council, on 10th July 1980, the Palace caught fire for the second time. An area comprising the Great Hall, Banqueting Suite, and former roller rink together with the theatre dressing rooms was completely destroyed. Only Palm Court and the area occupied by the BBC escaped damage.


Development and restoration work began soon after and the Palace was re-opened on 17th March 1988. It continues as a Charitable Trust administered by the London Borough of Haringey.

http://www.alexandrapalace.com/timeline/

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2 years
Borderline links don't work, the image just goes at the beginning and you can not choose where to put it or remove it.
Reply
2 years
2 years
ze2000 For security reasons it is better not to allow users to insert HTML elements (such as images). However what do you thing of making like a gallery of images at the beginning or the end of the article?
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2 years
2 years
Borderline Nice, but I would even put some in he middle, because with pictures its easier to. Read
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2 years